Wednesday, November 22, 2017

DARPA Is Spending $65 Million to Meld Mind and Machine



DARPA Is Spending $65 Million to Meld Mind and Machine

The U.S. defense agency that specializes in "out-there" science and technology endeavors is on a quest to bridge the gap between brain and…

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Read it on blogs.discovermagazine.com




Fronto-parietal structural connectivity in childhood predicts development of functional connectivity and reasoning ability: a large-scale longitudinal investigation



Fronto-parietal structural connectivity in childhood predicts development of functional connectivity and reasoning ability: a large-scale longitudinal investigation

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Read it on jneurosci.org




Friday, November 17, 2017

Can brain training reduce dementia risk? Despite new research, the jury is still out



Can brain training reduce dementia risk? Despite new research, the jury is still out

From The Guardian, a Flipboard magazine by The Guardian

There are good reasons to be cautious about a new study claiming computer-based training can reduce the risk of…

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Read it on theguardian.com




Dementia breakthrough? Brain-training game 'significantly reduces risk'



Dementia breakthrough? Brain-training game 'significantly reduces risk'

From Brain, a Flipboard magazine by tommysclee

A recent study has been hailed as a "breakthrough" in dementia prevention, after finding that a brain-training exercise can…

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Read it on medicalnewstoday.com




Wednesday, November 15, 2017

How emotions influence our internal clock



How emotions influence our internal clock

Human beings have an internal clock that enables the subconscious perception and estimation of time periods. A research team under Dr. Roland Thomaschke of…

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Read it on medicalxpress.com




Monday, November 13, 2017

Memory complaints and cognitive decline: Data from the GuidAge study



Memory complaints and cognitive decline: Data from the GuidAge study

From THE SCIENCE OF My LIFE, a Flipboard magazine by duskdiver

A memory complaint, also called Subjective Cognitive Decline (SCD), is a subjective disorder that appears to be relatively common,…

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Read it on eurekalert.org



******************************************************
Kevin McGrew, PhD
Educational Psychologist
Director, Institute for Applied Psychometrics
IAP
******************************************************

Neurons are seen exploding across the brain "like fireworks" in the most detailed map ever made



Neurons are seen exploding across the brain "like fireworks" in the most detailed map ever made

From Brain Philosophy, a Flipboard magazine by Sandra Clark

Beyond teaching us more about the structure of the brain, these maps could help unlock some of the…

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Read it on alphr.com




Sunday, November 12, 2017

Brain imaging reveals brain stem alterations in children with autism



Brain imaging reveals brain stem alterations in children with autism

From Brain/Vision, a Flipboard magazine by CinemaoftheMind

Children with autism show different patterns of connectivity than controls do in brain stem regions associated with balance.…

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Read it on spectrumnews.org




Brain imaging reveals brain stem alterations in children with autism



Brain imaging reveals brain stem alterations in children with autism

From Brain/Vision, a Flipboard magazine by CinemaoftheMind

Children with autism show different patterns of connectivity than controls do in brain stem regions associated with balance.…

Read it on Flipboard

Read it on spectrumnews.org




Friday, November 10, 2017

Research Byte: Is General Intelligence Little More Than the Speed of Higher-Order Processing?

Although a small sample, this is still and interesting study. The results are consistent with the continued nexus of the g, Gf, Gwm, attentional control and speed of higher order processing (especially P300 in ERP’s), white matter tract integrity and the PFIT model of intelligence as well as the recent process overlap theory (POT) of g.

Click on images to enlarge









Article link.

Anna-Lena Schubert, Dirk Hagemann, and Gidon T. Frischkorn Heidelberg University

ABSTRACT

Individual differences in the speed of information processing have been hypothesized to give rise to individual differences in general intelligence. Consistent with this hypothesis, reaction times (RTs) and latencies of event-related potential have been shown to be moderately associated with intelligence. These associations have been explained either in terms of individual differences in some brain-wide property such as myelination, the speed of neural oscillations, or white-matter tract integrity, or in terms of individual differences in specific processes such as the signal-to-noise ratio in evidence accumulation, executive control, or the cholinergic system. Here we show in a sample of 122 participants, who completed a battery of RT tasks at 2 laboratory sessions while an EEG was recorded, that more intelligent individuals have a higher speed of higher-order information processing that explains about 80% of the variance in general intelligence. Our results do not support the notion that individuals with higher levels of general intelligence show advantages in some brain-wide property. Instead, they suggest that more intelligent individuals benefit from a more efficient transmission of information from frontal attention and working memory processes to temporal-parietal processes of memory storage.

Keywords: ERP latencies, event-related potentials, intelligence, processing speed, reaction times



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Thursday, November 09, 2017

Childhood Music Training Induces Change in Micro and Macroscopic Brain Structure: Results from a Longitudinal Study | Cerebral Cortex



Childhood Music Training Induces Change in Micro and Macroscopic Brain Structure: Results from a Longitudinal Study | Cerebral Cortex

From Neuro, a Flipboard magazine by Jack

Several studies comparing adult musicians and nonmusicians have…

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Read it on academic.oup.com




Monday, November 06, 2017

12 Finalists named to take part in the Brainnovations Pitch Contest (December 6th, 2017)



12 Finalists named to take part in the Brainnovations Pitch Contest (December 6th, 2017)

Proud and excited to announce the 12 groundbreaking startups that will get to pitch their idea and solutions at…

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Read it on sharpbrains.com




Sunday, November 05, 2017

Wig (2017, in press)-Segregated Systems of Human Brain Networks


Click on images to enlarge.

Article link.

This is an excellent and thought provoking brain network review that addresses the push-pull between optimal (and necessary) brain network segregation and more transient and fluid integration “on demand” to meet new task demands. Excellent summary.








ABSTRACT

The organization of the brain network enables its function. Evaluation of this organization has revealed that large-scale brain networks consist of multiple segregated subnetworks of interacting brain areas. Descriptions of resting-state network architecture have provided clues for understanding the functional significance of these segregated subnetworks, many of which correspond to distinct brain systems. The present report synthesizes accumulating evidence to reveal how maintaining segregated brain systems renders the human brain network functionally specialized, adaptable to task demands, and largely resilient following focal brain damage. The organizational properties
that support system segregation are harmonious with the properties that promote integration across the network, but confer unique and important features to the brain network that are central to its function and behavior.

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Friday, November 03, 2017

The landscape of brain health innovation: 130 experts and pioneers in 18 countries (and counting)



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The landscape of brain health innovation: 130 experts and pioneers in 18 countries (and counting)
// SharpBrains

— Registrants for the 2017 SharpBrains Virtual Summit (December 5-7th) as of November 3rd, 2017

Just a quick update on how registration stands for the upcoming 2017 SharpBrains Virtual Summit: Brain Health & Enhancement in the Digital Age (December 5-7th).

We are proud to report that so far 130 experts, pioneers and practitioners are registered to participate.

95 seem to be based in the US and 35 abroad, based on IP address during registration, with the following country breakdown:

  • United States 95
  • Australia 7
  • Canada 6
  • United Kingdom 4
  • Israel 3
  • Norway 2
  • Italy 2
  • Taiwan 1
  • Singapore 1
  • India 1
  • France 1
  • Sweden 1
  • Spain 1
  • Portugal 1
  • Brazil 1
  • Argentina 1
  • South Africa 1
  • Brunei 1

__________

Please consider joining us to explore the latest brain science and tech and market trends and to help shape Brain Health & Enhancement in the Digital Age.

For context, organizations represented in past Summits include: AARP, Alegent Health Immanuel Medical Center, Allstate Insurance, Alzheimer's Association, BBC, Bon Secours New York Health System, Brain Injury Association of America, Campbell Soup Company, Greenville Hospital System, Harvard Business Review, HealthComm Inc., Human Dimension Taskforce, US Army, Institute For The Future, Intel, Johnson & Johnson, Los Angeles County Dept of Public Health, McGovern Institute of Neurotechnology, MIT, National Resource Ctr. Osher Lifelong Learning Institutes, Nutrition Science Solutions, One Laptop Per Child, OptumHealth Behavioral Solutions, Piedmont Gardens, PsychologyToday, Procter & Gamble, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Stanford University, Sun Microsystems, UC Berkeley, UnitedHealth Group, Winter Park Health Foundation, Workers' Compensation Regulatory Authority, UCSF.

And the backgrounds of previous participants include: Biomedical Engineers, CEOs, Digital Media professionals, Entrepreneurs, Game publishers, Healthcare technologists, Marketing Executives, Medical Students, Neurologists, Neuropsychologists, Non profit board members, Occupational Therapists, Pharmaceutical Executives, Post doctorate researchers, Professors and Researchers, Psychiatrists, Psychologists, Psychotherapists, Scientific Publishers, Social Workers, Speech Pathologists, Talent management/HR, and Wellness professionals.

Looking forward to a great conference!

__________

Learn more & Reserve your Spot HERE

(10%-off promo code for SharpBrains readers: sharp2017)


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Thursday, November 02, 2017

How to detect the risk of dyslexia before learning to read - Scienmag: Latest Science and Health News



How to detect the risk of dyslexia before learning to read - Scienmag: Latest Science and Health News

Almost 10% of the world population suffers dyslexia. Establishing an early diagnosis would allow…

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Thursday, October 26, 2017

DARPA's new brain device increases learning speed by 40%



DARPA's new brain device increases learning speed by 40%

Cheap and Non-Invasive New research funded by the U.S. Department of Defense's Defense Advanced Research Project Agency (DARPA) has…

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******************************************************
Kevin McGrew, PhD
Educational Psychologist
Director, Institute for Applied Psychometrics
IAP
******************************************************

Musicians have better memory than nonmusicians: A meta-analysis

More research, this time a meta-analysis, documenting the cognitive benefits of musical training. I better not show this to my mother who never liked the fact that I only took one year of piano:)

Musicians have better memory than nonmusicians: A meta-analysis

Francesca Talamini, Gianmarco Altoรจ, Barbara Carretti, Massimo Grassi

Abstract

The three meta-analyses revealed a small effect size for long-term memory, and a medium effect size for short-term and working memory, suggesting that musicians perform better than nonmusicians in memory tasks. Moreover, the effect of the moderator suggested that, the type of stimuli influences this advantage.

Click on image to enlarge.




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Wednesday, October 25, 2017

More support for P-FIT model of intelligence

Abstract

The authors describe the brain regions involved in the process of intelligence using as a basis, the models of the theory of frontoparietal integration (P-FIT Model). They also correlate the model described with functional areas of Brodmann, integrating them into the tertiary brain areas and address the subcortical structures involved in cognitive processes, including the memory. The studies performed by functional magnetic resonance, also unmask various regions related with intelligence, neither previously described by Brodmann nor even in conventional models of learning. The anterior insular cortex presents itself as the most recent tertiary area to be considered. Subcortical structures, when injured, mimick injuries to the cerebral cortex, demonstrating their great participation in cognition. The topographies of aphasia and the functioning mechanisms of the bearers of learning disorders, including dyslexic, dysgraphia and dyscalculic should be reconsidered. A better understanding of this topographic anatomy may clarify the mechanisms used in those individuals with cerebral lesions.

Click on images to enlarge







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Sunday, October 22, 2017

Elsevier Neuroscience Books Win BMA Book Awards | SciTech Connect



Elsevier Neuroscience Books Win BMA Book Awards | SciTech Connect

We are proud to announce that several Elsevier neuroscience books were honored at the British Medical Association (BMA) annual 2017…

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Thursday, October 12, 2017

Meet 40 Experts and Innovators shaping Brain Health & Enhancement on December 5-7th, at the 2017 SharpBrains Virtual Summit



Meet 40 Experts and Innovators shaping Brain Health & Enhancement on December 5-7th, at the 2017 SharpBrains Virtual Summit

We are proud to announce these 40 confirmed Summit Speakers, Chairs and…

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Monday, October 09, 2017

Predicting when a sound will occur relies on the brain's motor system - Scienmag: Latest Science and Health News



Predicting when a sound will occur relies on the brain's motor system - Scienmag: Latest Science and Health News

Whether it is dancing or just tapping one foot to the beat, we all experience how…

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Thursday, September 28, 2017

Saturday, September 23, 2017

The Human Brain Is a Time Machine



The Human Brain Is a Time Machine

From New York Magazine, a Flipboard magazine by New York Magazine

"Time" is the most common noun in the English language, Dean Buonomano tells us on the first page of his new book, Your Brain Is a Time Machine: The Neuroscience and…

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Read it on nymag.com




Wednesday, September 20, 2017

Working Memory: How You Keep Things 'In Mind' Over the Short Term



Working Memory: How You Keep Things 'In Mind' Over the Short Term

From Twitter, a Flipboard magazine by Elsevier Neuro

When you need to remember a phone number, a shopping list or a set of instructions, you rely on what psychologists and neuroscientists…

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Read it on scitechconnect.elsevier.com



******************************************************
Kevin McGrew, PhD
Educational Psychologist
Director, Institute for Applied Psychometrics
IAP
******************************************************

Monday, September 18, 2017

Brain Training - The "Controversy"



Brain Training - The "Controversy"

From Twitter, a Flipboard magazine by Elsevier Neuro

The Meriam-Webster defines training as: "the skill, knowledge, or experience acquired by one that trains." In combination with the word "brain" it becomes a…

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Tuesday, September 12, 2017

Sharing Motor control of handwriting in the developing brain: A review via BrowZine

Motor control of handwriting in the developing brain: A review
Palmis, Sarah; Danna, Jeremy; Velay, Jean-Luc; Longcamp, Marieke
Cognitive Neuropsychology: Articles in press

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Saturday, September 09, 2017

Sharing Cerebellar Contributions to Language in Typical and Atypical Development: A Review via BrowZine

Cerebellar Contributions to Language in Typical and Atypical Development: A Review
Vias, Carolina; Dick, Anthony Steven
Developmental Neuropsychology: Articles in press

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Thursday, September 07, 2017

Smartphone app scans pupils to detect concussions



Smartphone app scans pupils to detect concussions

Severe concussions where a person is visibly shaken or knocked unconscious are obviously cause for concern, but milder ones that go undetected can…

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Review: The neuroscience of intelligence by Richard J. Haier via BrowZine

Review: The neuroscience of intelligence by Richard J. Haier
Sitartchouk, Arseni; Evans, Alan C.
Intelligence: Articles in press

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Monday, September 04, 2017

Empathy Is a Clock That Ticks in the Consciousness of Another: The Science of How Our Social Interactions Shape Our Experience of Time



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Empathy Is a Clock That Ticks in the Consciousness of Another: The Science of How Our Social Interactions Shape Our Experience of Time
// Brain Pickings

"We may be born alone, but childhood ends with a synchrony of clocks, as we lend ourselves fully to the contagion of time."


Empathy Is a Clock That Ticks in the Consciousness of Another: The Science of How Our Social Interactions Shape Our Experience of Time
When I was growing up, my father — a kind man of quick intellect and encyclopedic knowledge about esoteric subjects — had, and still has, one habit that never failed to make other people uneasy and to infuriate my mother: In conversation, the interval of time that elapses between the other person's sentiment or question and my father's response greatly exceeds the average, a lapse swelling with Kierkegaard's assertion that "the moment is not properly an atom of time but an atom of eternity."
At first, one might suspect that my father is taking an incubatory pause to produce a considered response. But, soon, it becomes apparent that these disorienting durations have no correlation with the complexity of the question — even when asked something as simple as the time of day, he would often let miniature eternities pass and lasso the other person in anxiety as the contrast between the natural response time and my father's gapes its discomfiting abyss of ambiguity.
It turns out that my father's liberal pauses are so discomposing because our experience of time has a central social component — an internal clock inheres in our capacity for intersubjectivity, intuitively governing our social interactions and the interpersonal mirroring that undergirds the human capacity for empathy.
This social-synchronistic function of time is what New Yorker staff writer Alan Burdick examines in Why Time Flies: A Mostly Scientific Investigation (public library) — a layered, rigorously researched, lyrically narrated inquiry into the most befuddling dimension of existence.

Discus chronologicus, a German depiction of time from the early 1720s, from Cartographies of Time

Burdick begins at the beginning — the ur-question of how the universe originated from nothing and what this means for time, a question at the heart of the landmark 1922 debate between Einstein and Bergson that shaped our modern understanding of time. Burdick asks:
For argument's sake, I'll accept that perhaps the universe did not exist before the Big Bang — but it exploded in something, right? What was that? What was there before the beginning? Proposing such questions, the astrophysicist Stephen Hawking has said, is like standing at the South Pole and asking which way is south: "Earlier times simply would not be defined."
Nearly a century after Borges's exquisite refutation of time in language"Time is a river which sweeps me along, but I am the river; it is a tiger which destroys me, but I am the tiger; it is a fire which consumes me, but I am the fire." — Burdick adds with an eye to the inherent limitations of our metaphors:
Perhaps Hawking is trying to be reassuring. What he seems to mean is that human language has a limit. We (or at least the rest of us) reach this boundary whenever we ponder the cosmic. We imagine by analogy and metaphor: that strange and vast thing is like this smaller, more familiar thing. The universe is a cathedral, a clockworks, an egg. But the parallels ultimately diverge; only an egg is an egg. Such analogies appeal precisely because they are tangible elements of the universe. As terms, they are self-contained — but they cannot contain the container that holds them. So it is with time. Whenever we talk about it, we do so in terms of something lesser. We find or lose time, like a set of keys; we save and spend it, like money. Time creeps, crawls, flies, flees, flows, and stands still; it is abundant or scarce; it weighs on us with palpable heft.
[…]
Yet whatever one calls it, we share a rough idea of what's meant: a lasting sense of one's self moving in a sea of selves, dependent yet alone; a sense, or perhaps a deep and common wish, that I somehow belongs to we, and that this we belongs to something even larger and less comprehensible; and the recurring thought, so easy to brush aside in the daily effort to cross the street safely and get through one's to-do list, much less to confront the world's true crises, that my time, our time, matters precisely because it ends.

Illustration by Harvey Weiss from Time Is When by Beth Youman Gleick, 1960

From the temporal meditations of the ancient philosophers to the last hundred years of ingenious psychological experiments, Burdick goes on to explore such aspects of his subject — a nearly infinite subject, to be sure, which makes his endeavor all the more impressive — as why time dilates and contracts depending on whether we are having fun or facing danger, how fetuses are able to coordinate their circadian activity, and what we are actually measuring when we speak of keeping time. In a fascinating chapter detailing the complex ecosystem of time-making — the inventions, standardizations, and global teams of scientists responsible for measuring and synchronizing earthly time — Burdick reflects on the tremendous coordination of human efforts keeping the world's clocks ticking:
Time is a social phenomenon. This property is not incidental to time; it is its essence. Time, equally in single cells as in their human conglomerates, is the engine of interaction. A single clock works only as long as it refers, sooner or later, obviously or not, to the other clocks around it. One can rage about it, and we do. But without a clock and the dais of time, we each rage in silence, alone.


But our technologies are always prosthetic extensions of our consciousness — time, it turns out, is an innately social phenomenon not only in how it is measured, but in how it is experienced. Burdick cites the research of French neuropsychologist Sylvie Droit-Volet, who studies the warping of our temporal perception. In one experiment, she presented people with images of human faces — some neutral, some happy, some angry, some frightened — each displayed on the screen for anywhere between half a second to a second and a half. The research subjects were then asked to evaluate how long the faces appeared for.
She found that across images displayed for the same duration, happy faces were perceived to last longer than neutral ones and shorter than angry or fearful ones. Burdick explains:
The key ingredient seems to be a physiological response called arousal, which isn't what you might think. In experimental psychology, "arousal" refers to the degree to which the body is preparing itself to act in some manner. It's measured through heart rate and the skin's electrical conductivity; sometimes subjects are asked to rate their own arousal in comparison to images of faces or puppet figures. Arousal can be thought of as the physiological expression of one's emotions or, perhaps, as a precursor of physical action; in practice there may be little difference. By standard measures, anger is the most arousing emotion, for viewer and angry person alike, followed by fear, then happiness, then sadness. Arousal is thought to accelerate the pacemaker, causing more ticks than usual to accumulate in a given interval, thereby making emotionally laden images seem to last longer than others of equal duration… Physiologists and psychologists think of arousal as a primed physical state — not moving but poised to move. When we see movement, even implied movement in a static image, the thinking goes, we enact that movement internally. In a sense, arousal is a measure of your ability to put yourself in another person's shoes.

Art by Oliver Tallec from This Is a Poem That Heals Fish by Jean-Pierre Simeรณn

We perform this kind of emotional mimicry intuitively and incessantly over the course of our daily social interactions, in some degree donning the emotional and mental outfit of each person with whom we come into close contact. But we are also, apparently, absorbing each other's sense of time, which is encoded in our psychoemotional states. In another study, Droit-Volet found that research subjects perceived images of elderly faces to last shorter than they actually did and misjudged the duration of young faces in the opposite direction — viewers were essentially embodying the typically slower movements of the elderly. Burdick explains:
A slower clock ticks less often in a given interval of time; fewer ticks accumulate, so the interval is judged to be briefer than it actually is. Perceiving or remembering an elderly person induces the viewer to reenact, or simulate, their bodily states, namely their slow movement.
A book, Rebecca Solnit memorably wrote, is "a heart that only beats in the chest of another." In a very real sense, we are each a temporally open book and empathy a clock that only ticks in the consciousness of another. Burdick writes:
Our shared temporal distortions can be thought of as manifestations of empathy; after all, to embody another's time is to place oneself in his or her skin. We imitate each other's gestures and emotions — but we're more likely to do so, studies find, with people with whom we identify or whose company we would like to share.
[…]
Life dictates that we possess some sort of internal mechanism to keep time and monitor brief durations — yet the one we carry around can be thrown off course by the least emotional breeze. What's the point of owning such a fallible clock? … Maybe there's another way to think about it, Droit-Volet suggests. It's not that our clock doesn't run well; on the contrary, it's superb at adapting to the ever-changing social and emotional environment that we navigate every day. The time that I perceive in social settings isn't solely mine, nor is there just one cast to it, which is part of what gives our social interactions their shading. "There is thus no unique, homogeneous time but instead multiple experiences of time," Droit-Volet writes in one paper. "Our temporal distortions directly reflect the way our brain and body adapt to these multiple times." She quotes the philosopher Henri Bergson: "On doit mettre de cรดte le temps unique, seuls comptent les temps multiples, ceux de l'expรฉrience." We must put aside the idea of a single time, all that counts are the multiple times that make up experience.
Our slightest social exchanges — our glances, our smiles and frowns — gain potency from our ability to synchronize them among ourselves, Droit-Volet notes. We bend time to make time with one another, and the many temporal distortions we experience are indicators of empathy; the better able I am to envisage myself in your body and your state of mind, and you in mine, the better we can each recognize a threat, an ally, a friend, or someone in need. But empathy is a fairly sophisticated trait, a mark of emotional adulthood; it takes learning and time. As children grow and develop empathy, they gain a better sense of how to navigate the social world. Put another way, it may be that a critical aspect of growing up is learning how to bend our time in step with others. We may be born alone, but childhood ends with a synchrony of clocks, as we lend ourselves fully to the contagion of time.
Perhaps Borges was right, after all, that time is the substance we are made of.
Complement the thoroughly fascinating Why Time Flies with James Gleick on how our time-travel fantasies illuminate consciousness, Patti Smith on time and transformation, T.S. Eliot's timeless ode to time, and Hannah Arendt on time, space, and our thinking ego, then revisit the story of how Rilke and Rodin gave birth to the modern meaning of empathy.

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