Thursday, March 31, 2011

FYiPost: Good heart beat perception = good temporal processing?

What underlies our sense of time? A popular account claims an internal pacemaker emits regular pulses, which are detected by an accumulator. The amount of accumulated pulses represents the amount of time that's passed.

Trouble is, this is all very theoretical and no-one really knows how or where in the brain these functions are enacted. One suggestion is that the pulses are based on bodily feedback and in particular the heart-beat. Consistent with this is a recent brain imaging study that showed activity in the insular (a brain region associated with representing internal bodily states) rose linearly as people paid attention to time intervals (pdf). Now a behavioural study by Karin Meissner and Marc Wittmann has built on these findings by showing that people who are more sensitive to their own heart-beat are also better at judging time intervals.

<snip> .... go to link below for complete post.


_________________________________

ResearchBlogging.orgMeissner, K., and Wittmann, M. (2011). Body signals, cardiac awareness, and the perception of time. Biological Psychology, 86 (3), 289-297 DOI: 10.1016/j.biopsycho.2011.01.001





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Wednesday, March 30, 2011

Report on Dx and treatment of children with mental disorders@NIMHgov, 3/30/11 3:16 PM

Mental Health NIMH (@NIMHgov)
3/30/11 3:16 PM
Read the Hastings Ctr report that examines controversy in diagnosing and treating kids with mental disorders bit.ly/hsTLTw #nimhgov


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Friday, March 25, 2011

FYiPOST: PEBS Neuroethics Roundup from JHU Guest Blogger

Last Edition's Most Popular Article: The self: why science is not enough, New Scientist In The Popular Press: Can a Pill Make You Limitless? The Ethics of Cognitive Enhancement, Berman Bulletin Video: Paul Root Wolpe: It's time to question bio-engineering,...





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Thursday, March 24, 2011

Schizophrenia Research is Leading the Way in Cognitive Remediation

As announced by the NIMH a few months ago, schizophrenia can now be considered as a brain disorder. Research is focusing on the cognitive deficits as the main problem of the disorder, probably preceding and perhaps leading to the symptoms of hallucinations and delusions.

A recent article in the Psychiatric Times reviews the different cognitive remediation techniques used with people suffering from schizophrenia. This is of interest to anybody working on mental health. Indeed, as Sophia Vino­gradov, Interim Vice Chair Psy­chi­a­try at UCSF will discuss during the SharpBrains Summit (next week!) schizophrenia is leading the way in understanding how to identify and address brain-based cognitive deficits associated with the disorder.

…most [Cognitive Remediation (CR) programs] are now computerized. Some  programs use a mix of general educational software, but many train participants with specialized computer software designed to improve cognition.

Most CR programs aim to improve the cognitive domains usually associated with deficits in schizophrenia—for instance verbal and visual working memory, executive function, attention, and processing speed.

CR has been demonstrated to improve overall (global) cognition as well as specific domains, including attention, executive function, working memory, verbal learning and memory, processing speed, and affect recognition.






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Tuesday, March 22, 2011

RE: Musical beat deafness case

Wow. Interesting.

Amy Vega, MS, CCC-SLP

Interactive Metronome, Inc

Clinical Education Director

Clinical Advisory Board Director

Clinical Education Administrator

avega@interactivemetronome.com

(877) 994-6776 x 253

 

 

 

From: Iapsych [mailto:iapsych@me.com]
Sent: Saturday, March 19, 2011 5:46 PM
To: Blog Time Posts; Matthew Wukasch; Amy Vega; Bricole Reincke; Rob Ryan; Al Guerra
Subject: Musical beat deafness case

 

Sunday, March 20, 2011

FYiPOST: New Special Issue Synaptic Plasticity & Interneurons

Neuropharmacology , Volume 60, Issue 5, Pages 711-822 (April 2011). Edited by Dimitri M. Kullman and Karri P. Lamsa






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Saturday, March 19, 2011

Musical beat deafness case

FYiPOST: Coverage of Neuroscience in the Popular Media – The New Psychobabble

Reading any newspaper, whether online or in print, whether a serious publication like the New York Times or one that's more entertainment-minded like Oprah Magazine, you will invariably find an article discussing neuroscience. Even the non-fiction bestseller lists are populated with brain-centered books like Proust was a Neuroscientist, The Female Brain, and A Whole New Mind. While it is certainly heartening that the public is as excited about the latest findings on the brain as are the neuroscientists who do serious study and lab work, neuroscience in the popular media has become nothing short of a farce. The problems with the media's depiction of neuroscience runs the gamut from citing studies incorrectly, drawing grand, false conclusions from misinterpreted data, and appropriating brain science in the name of explaining phenomena beyond the field's immediate purview.

........click on link below for rest of the story.






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Friday, March 18, 2011

RE: Cerebellum neural circuits and motor learning@TheNeuroScience, 3/17/11 9:13 PM

I bet she’d be interested in the literature on temporal processing and in the IM. J 

Amy Vega, MS, CCC-SLP

Interactive Metronome, Inc

Clinical Education Director

Clinical Advisory Board Director

Clinical Education Administrator

avega@interactivemetronome.com

(877) 994-6776 x 253

 

 

 

From: iapsych [mailto:iapsych@me.com]
Sent: Friday, March 18, 2011 9:43 AM
To: Blog Time Posts; Matthew Wukasch; Amy Vega; Bricole Reincke; Rob Ryan; Al Guerra
Subject: Cerebellum neural circuits and motor learning@TheNeuroScience, 3/17/11 9:13 PM

 

Nice video explanation of importance of neural circuits

Neuro Science (@TheNeuroScience)
3/17/11 9:13 PM
Building a Circuit Diagram of the Brain sns.ly/qKc4y7



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Educational Psychologist

 

Cerebellum neural circuits and motor learning@TheNeuroScience, 3/17/11 9:13 PM

Nice video explanation of importance of neural circuits

Neuro Science (@TheNeuroScience)
3/17/11 9:13 PM
Building a Circuit Diagram of the Brain sns.ly/qKc4y7


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Educational Psychologist

Saturday, March 12, 2011

FYiPOST: SAGE Open - submit your manuscripts and become part of this groundbreaking publication



Subject: SAGE Open - submit your manuscripts and become part of this groundbreaking publication
Reply-To: mailbox21946x119339 <sagebb@updates.sagepub.com>

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Mobile user? Try the mobile version.

SAGE open
 

SAGE Open is now accepting manuscripts - prepare yours today!
www.sagepub.com
Forward
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Dear Kevin McGrew,

SAGE Open

SAGE Open, our new open access publication, has received more than 200 submissions since launching on January 1, with new articles being submitted daily. Be a part of this groundbreaking publication and prepare your manuscript today.

SAGE Open publishes peer-reviewed, original research and review articles in an interactive, open-access format. Articles may span the full spectrum of the social and behavioral sciences and the humanities. Find out more, including manuscript submission guidelines, at www.sageopen.com.

 

Why publish in SAGE Open?

  • Quick review and decision times for authors
  • Speedy, continuous-publication online format
  • Global distribution of your research via SAGE Journals Online, including enhanced online features such as public usage metrics, comments features, subject categories, and article ranking and recommendations
  • Professional copyediting and typesetting of your article
  • $195 introductory author acceptance fee (discounted from the regular price of $695)

Consider publishing in SAGE Open if you want...

  • Quality reviews and efficient production, ensuring the quickest publication time
  • Free, broad, and global distribution on a powerful, highly discoverable publishing platform
  • Branding and marketing by a world-leading social science publisher, including promotion of your article via publicity and social media channels
  • Open access publication due to university or government mandates
 

Manuscript submissions are handled online through SAGE Track, SAGE's web-based peer review and submission system, powered by ScholarOne Manuscripts™. Submit your manuscripts today at http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/sageopen.

Interested in serving as a reviewer?

  1. Visit the manuscript submission site and click the "Create Account: new users click here" button in the center of the screen.
  2. Be prepared to enter your e-mail address and to select at least five (5) keywords to describe your areas of expertise.

Please direct any inquiries to sageopen@sagepub.com.

Sincerely,

Bob Howard
Executive Director, Social Science Journals

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Friday, March 11, 2011

FYiPOST: PEBS Neuroethics Roundup from JHU Guest Blogger

Last Edition's Most Popular Article: Go Easy on Yourself, a New Wave of Research Urges, New York Times In The Popular Press: The Next Wave Of Smart Drugs, Gizmodo Despite advances, technology can't ID 'criminal brain', MSNBC Pacemaker Zaps Stomach...





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More on importance of IQ Brain Clock and learning@brainfitness, 3/11/11 12:37 PM

Brain Fitness (@brainfitness)
3/11/11 12:37 PM
The importance of TIME in LEARNING: bit.ly/eGTSLp #edchat


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Educational Psychologist

Thursday, March 10, 2011

FYiPOST: The State of the Brain Fitness Market

In honor of Brain Aware­ness Week (March 14-20th), any­one who reg­is­ters to participate in the 2011 SharpBrains Summit BEFORE MARCH 20TH will obtain a com­pli­men­tary 207-page PDF copy of the full mar­ket report Trans­form­ing Brain Health with Dig­i­tal Tools to Assess, Enhance and Treat Cog­ni­tion Across the Lifes­pan — The State of the Brain Fit­ness Mar­ket 2010. Please note that the nor­mal price of this report is $1,295. This report includes pro­pri­etary sur­veys, mar­ket data and in-depth analy­sis of 32 com­pa­nies, 10 Inno­va­tion Case Stud­ies pre­pared by 2010 Inno­va­tion Awards Win­ners and Final­ists, and 23 Research Exec­u­tive Briefs pre­pared by lead­ing scientists.

Report Sum­mary

This 207-page report tracks devel­op­ments at over thirty pub­lic and pri­vate com­pa­nies offer­ing dig­i­tal tools to assess, enhance and repair brain-based cog­ni­tive and self-regulation func­tions and pro­vides impor­tant indus­try data, insights and analy­sis to help investors, exec­u­tives, entre­pre­neurs, and pol­icy mak­ers nav­i­gate the oppor­tu­ni­ties and risks of this rapidly grow­ing field. The report dis­cusses the impli­ca­tions of cog­ni­tive neu­ro­science on healthy aging, edu­ca­tion, peak per­for­mance, and a num­ber of dis­or­ders such as atten­tion deficits, dyslexia, stroke and trau­matic brain injury, schiz­o­phre­nia, mild cog­ni­tive impair­ment, and Alzheimer's dis­ease. The report also pro­vides infor­ma­tion and frame­works to help insti­tu­tions make informed invest­ment, part­ner­ing and pur­chase decisions.

The report includes:

  • Sur­vey: The com­plete results of an exclu­sive March 2010 mar­ket sur­vey with 1,900+ respon­dents (in Chap­ter 2)
  • Ven­dor analy­sis: A pro­pri­etary Mar­ket & Research Momen­tum Matrix to cat­e­go­rize main tech­nol­ogy ven­dors into four cat­e­gories, com­bined with 32 in-depth pro­files (in Chap­ter 3)
  • Inno­va­tion case stud­ies: Ten detailed case stud­ies pre­pared by the Top 10 Final­ists in the 2010 Brain Fit­ness Inno­va­tion Awards (in Chap­ter 4)
  • Research analy­sis: 23 Research Exec­u­tive Briefs writ­ten by lead­ing sci­en­tists at promi­nent research labs to pro­vide a unique win­dow into emerg­ing sci­ence and its impli­ca­tions (in Chap­ter 5)

–> Register to participate in the 2011 SharpBrains Summit BEFORE MARCH 20TH and obtain a com­pli­men­tary 207-page PDF copy of the full mar­ket report Trans­form­ing Brain Health with Dig­i­tal Tools to Assess, Enhance and Treat Cog­ni­tion Across the Lifes­pan — The State of the Brain Fit­ness Mar­ket 2010.

Table of Contents

Exec­u­tive Summary

Chap­ter 1. A Bird's-Eye View of the Grow­ing Field
– A Mar­ket in the mak­ing: size, seg­ments and themes
– Value propo­si­tion and busi­ness mod­els per cus­tomer seg­ment
– Major Devel­op­ments in 2009/ 2010: Pol­icy, Demand, Sup­ply, Sci­ence
– Pol­icy: from dis­ease treat­ment to enhanc­ing cog­ni­tion and men­tal well­ness across lifes­pan
– Demand: employ­ers, insur­ers and health plans join con­sumers and seniors' com­mu­ni­ties
– Sci­ence: from Magic Pills to Tools in the Toolkit
– Sup­ply: finally, scal­able assess­ments and inte­grated solu­tions
– Nav­i­gat­ing the dig­i­tal brain health tech­nol­ogy land­scape
– Inter­view with Dr. Michael Merzenich — har­ness­ing neuroplasticity

Chap­ter 2. Mar­ket Sur­vey of Pri­or­i­ties, Beliefs, and Habits
– March 2010: Sur­vey of 1,900 decision-makers and early adopters
– Key take-aways
– Rank­ing of Brain Func­tions to Thrive in the XXI cen­tury
– Beliefs and Habits
– Pub­lic Aware­ness Pri­or­i­ties
– Pur­chase his­tory and com­par­a­tive cus­tomer sat­is­fac­tion
– Cus­tomer sat­is­fac­tion for four top prod­ucts
– Pur­chase inten­tions over next 12 months.
– Sur­vey details and demo­graphic information

Chap­ter 3. The Emerg­ing Com­pet­i­tive Land­scape
– Nav­i­gat­ing the land­scape for assess­ments, ther­a­pies, train­ing and ser­vices
– The Sharp­Brains Research-Market Momen­tum Matrix
– Sum­mary table: Sharp­Brains' Take on thirty-two Com­pa­nies
– Seven Lead­ers: Com­pany Pro­files
– Five High Poten­tials: Com­pany Pro­files
– Two Cross­words 2.0: Com­pany Pro­files
– Six Wait & See: Com­pany Pro­files
– Six Inno­v­a­tive Ser­vice Mod­els
– Six Inno­v­a­tive Start-Ups

Chap­ter 4. 2010 Inno­va­tion Awards: Ten Case Stud­ies
– Inno­va­tion Case Stud­ies: Sum­mary Table
– Judg­ing Panel, Cri­te­ria and Results
– Arrow­smith Pro­gram: Final­ist
– USA Hockey: Grand Prize Win­ner
– Nation­wide Mutual Insur­ance: Sil­ver Prize Win­ner
– Uni­ver­sity Behav­ioral Health­Care: Final­ist
– All­state: Sil­ver Prize Win­ner
– AAA Foun­da­tion for Traf­fic Safety: Final­ist
– Saint Luke's Brain and Stroke Insti­tute: Final­ist
– Oak­land Unifi ed School Dis­trict: Final­ist
– Men­tal Health Asso­ci­a­tion of Rock­land County: Final­ist
– SCAN Health Plan: Finalist

Chap­ter 5. Research & Devel­op­ment: 23 Research Exec­u­tive Briefs on Mea­sur­ing & Enhanc­ing Brain Fit­ness
– Recent Find­ings in Con­text
– Debunk­ing 10 typ­i­cal myths
– Research Exec­u­tive Briefs: Sum­mary Table
– Cog­ni­tion, neu­ro­pro­tec­tion and aging: A Nunes (Illi­nois), J Stein­er­man (Einstein-Montefiore)
– Mea­sur­ing and enhanc­ing dri­ving fi tness: N Cas­savaugh (Illi­nois), J Edwards (South Florida)
– Sur­vey of evidence-based cog­ni­tive train­ing method­olo­gies: T Alloway (Stir­ling), S Jaeggi & M Buschkuehl (Michi­gan, Bern), T Kling­berg (Karolin­ska), E Zelin­ski (USC Davis), D Vance (UAB), J Edwards (South Florida)
– Cog­ni­tive value and lim­i­ta­tions of 3 types of com­mer­cial videogames: R Haier (Mind Research Net­work), D Bave­lier & S Green (Rochester), A Kramer (Illi­nois)
– Cur­rent and future com­put­er­ized ther­a­pies: D Lear­month (City), D Bave­lier &B Hubert-Wallander (Rochester),
– Emerg­ing brain-based mark­ers: J Stein­er­man (Einstein-Montefiore), B Gib­son (Notre Dame), Y Stern (Colum­bia), D Rabiner (Duke)
– Emerg­ing clin­i­cal tools (neu­ro­feed­back, TMS, tDCS): L Hir­sh­berg & E Festa (Brown), J Cooney Hor­vath & A Pas­cual Leone & F Fregni(Harvard)
– Inter­view with Dr. Mar­tin Buschkuehl — Cross­word puz­zles vs. cog­ni­tive training

Chap­ter 6: K12 Schools
– Key trends and play­ers
– New Fed­eral Fund enables sig­nifi cant Sci­en­tific Learn­ing growth
– What Works Clearinghouse's take on Fast For­Word, Earo­bics, Read, Write &Type!
– Rein­vent­ing edu­ca­tion: from con­tent trans­fer to per­son­al­ized capac­ity devel­op­ment
– Per­spec­tive by Tracy Alloway — Work­ing Mem­ory pre­dicts aca­d­e­mic performance

Chap­ter 7: Employ­ers
– Key trends and play­ers
– Sports Teams: detect, treat Trau­matic Brain Injury
– Sports Teams: improv­ing Win Ratios
– Mil­i­tary appli­ca­tions: detect, treat Trau­matic Brain Injury
– Mil­i­tary appli­ca­tions: accel­er­ate learn­ing, train­ing, per­for­mance
– Cor­po­rate Amer­ica: new brain-based solu­tions to well­ness and train­ing
– The Mature Work­force adds urgency to brain fit­ness inno­va­tion
– Inter­view with Prof. Daniel Gopher – cog­ni­tive Sim­u­la­tions to enhance performance

Chap­ter 8: Con­sumers
– Key trends and play­ers
– Focus groups: 50+ con­sumers want use­ful, chal­leng­ing fun
– AARP sur­vey: 65+ con­sumers want health and inde­pen­dence (not anti­ag­ing)
– Demo­graphic profi le of "cog­ni­tive gym" mem­bers
– AAA pro­motes cog­ni­tive train­ing for dri­ving fit­ness
– New assess­ments: val­i­dated Alzheimer's screen­ing, brain fit­ness action plans
– From stand­alone prod­ucts to inte­grated online/ mobile plat­forms
– Claims by BBC Brain Test Britain mud­dle the waters (yes, more)
– Inter­view with Peter Kissinger — main­tain­ing dri­ving fit­ness as we age
– Per­spec­tive by Dr. Eliz­a­beth Zelin­ski on BBC Brain Test Britain
– Check­list for con­sumers eval­u­at­ing products

Chap­ter 9: Providers
– Key trends and play­ers
– Health reform and Men­tal Par­ity Law drive adop­tion of fi rst Brain-based Clin­i­cal Deci­sion Sup­port Sys­tems
– National Insti­tute of Health (NIH) Panel on AD/ Cog­ni­tive Decline Pre­ven­tion: our Analy­sis
– Con­tin­ued Growth of "Brain Fit­ness Cen­ters" in Senior Liv­ing com­mu­ni­ties
– Com­put­er­ized Cog­ni­tive Behav­ioral Ther­apy as first-line treat­ment in the UK
– US Health Plans and Insur­ers Expand Cog­ni­tive Well­ness, Retrain­ing, Rehab Toolk­its
– Rein­vent­ing TBI and schiz­o­phre­nia care
– Inter­view with Patrick Dono­hue – new frame­works and tools to stan­dard­ize care
– Per­spec­tive by Dr. Elkhonon Gold­berg – why and how neu­ropsy­chol­ogy needs to guide phar­ma­col­ogy
– Per­spec­tive by Dr. David Rabiner — com­par­ing Work­ing Mem­ory Train­ing &med­ica­tion treat­ment for ADHD
– Check­list for providers select­ing brain fit­ness pro­grams and solutions

Chap­ter 10: Future Direc­tions: Pro­jec­tions and Bot­tle­necks
– 2010–2015 Mar­ket Out­look
– 2015 Growth Pro­jec­tions and Sce­nar­ios
– Cat­e­gory risks and mit­i­ga­tion
– Five Per­spec­tives by thought-leaders and decision-makers
– Inter­view with Dr. John Docherty — Tech­nol­ogy as the miss­ing link to enable a brain-based model of Brain Care

In-depth Company Profiles

The tech­nol­ogy and ser­vice ven­dors ana­lyzed in depth in the report are:

  • Advanced Brain Tech­nolo­gies
  • Applied Cog­ni­tive Engi­neer­ing
  • Arrow­smith School
  • Brain Cen­ter Amer­ica
  • Brain Resource
  • CNS Vital Signs
  • Cog­nic­iti
  • Cog­ni­tive Fit­ness and Inno­v­a­tive Ther­a­pies
  • Cogmed
  • Cog­niFit
  • Cogstate
  • Dakim
  • E-Hub
  • Houghton Mif­flin
  • Learn­ing Enhance­ment Cor­po­ra­tion
  • Learn­ingRx
  • Lexia Learn­ing
  • Lumos Labs
  • Mar­bles: The Brain Store
  • Med­In­ter­act
  • Mem­ory Train­ing Cen­ters of Amer­ica
  • Mind360
  • MyBrain­Trainer
  • Neo­Corta
  • Neu­ro­Trax
  • NovaV­i­sion
  • Posit Sci­ence
  • Sci­en­tific Brain Train­ing
  • Sci­en­tific Learn­ing
  • Ultra­sis
  • United BioSource (acquired CDR)
  • Telos Inter­na­tional
  • Vibrant­Brains
  • Vig­or­ous Mind
  • Viv­ity Labs

–> Register to participate in the 2011 SharpBrains Summit BEFORE MARCH 20TH and obtain a com­pli­men­tary 207-page PDF copy of the full mar­ket report Trans­form­ing Brain Health with Dig­i­tal Tools to Assess, Enhance and Treat Cog­ni­tion Across the Lifes­pan — The State of the Brain Fit­ness Mar­ket 2010.






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Three layers of working memory?@PsyPost, 3/10/11 1:27 PM

PsyPost.org (@PsyPost)
3/10/11 1:27 PM
Study proves the brain has 3 layers of working memory bit.ly/gdxmZr


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Brain networks@brainfnet, 3/10/11 5:14 AM

Brain Network (@brainfnet)
3/10/11 5:14 AM
This article is a good introduction on complex brain networks. fb.me/JlknRcD1


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Educational Psychologist

Wednesday, March 09, 2011

FYiPOST: Psychologists who Tweet - first major update

We've updated our list of psychologists (plus a few stray neuroscientists, therapists, students and psych-bloggers) who Tweet. Follower counts were correct as of Friday 4 March 2011. Compare with the previous list compiled in November 2010. The Digest editorial team are in purple highlight.

Laura Kauffman. Child psychologist. Followers: 86444
Richard Wiseman. Parapsychologist. Followers: 68001
George Huba. Psychologist. Followers: 20628
Aleks Krotoski. Psychologist, tech journalist. Followers: 16043
Marsha Lucas. Neuropsychologist. Followers: 14462
Jonah Lehrer. Writer, blogger. Followers: 11080
Dan Ariely. Behavioural Economist, author. Followers: 10314
Jo Hemmings. Celebrity psychologist. Followers: 9735
Steven Pinker. Psycholinguist, evolutionary psychologist, author. Followers: 8978
David Ballard. Psychologist, Head of APA marketing. Followers: 6737
Graham Jones. Internet (cyber) psychologist. Followers: 6603
Christian Jarrett. That's me, editor of BPS Research Digest! Followers: 5417
Melanie Greenberg. Clinical health psychologist. Followers: 4723
Petra Boynton. Psychologist, sex educator. Followers: 4686
CiarĂ¡n O'Keeffe. Parapsychologist. Followers: 4603
Vaughan Bell. Clinical neuropsychologist, blogger. Followers: 4109
Mo Costandi. Writer, blogger. Followers: 4072
Jeremy Dean. Blogger. Followers: 3335
John Grohol. Founder of Psychcentral. Followers: 3182
Bruce Hood. Cognitive scientist. Followers: 2602
Rita Handrich. Psychologist, editor. Followers: 2435
David Eagleman. Neuroscientist, author. Followers: 2422
Daniel Levitin. Psychologist, author. Followers: 2419
Brian MacDonald. Clinical psychologist. Followers: 2371
David Webb101. Psychology tutor, blogger. Followers: 2320
Sandeep Gautam. Blogger. Followers: 1952
Jay Watts. Clinical psychologist, Lacanian. Followers: 1567
Maria Panagiotidi. Grad student. Followers: 1562
Wendy Cousins. Skeptic. Followers: 1473
Anthony Risser. Neuropsychologist, blogger. Followers: 1416
Chris Atherton. Cognitive psychologist. Followers: 1315
G. Tendayi Viki. Social psychologist. Followers: 1267
Ana Loback. Psychologist. Followers: 1244
Alex Linley. Positive psychologist. Followers: 1237
Mark Changizi. Cognitive psychologist, author. Followers: 1221
Jesse Bering. Psychologist, blogger. Followers: 1214
Rolfe Lindgren. Psychologist, personality expert. Followers: 1187
Cary Cooper. Occupational psychologist. Followers: 1093
Jason Goldman85. Grad student, blogger. Followers: 1082
Joseph LeDoux. Neuroscientist, rocker. Followers: 1033
Sophie Scott. Neuroscientist. Followers: 982
Chris French. Anomalistic psychologist. Followers: 973
Dorothy Bishop. Developmental neuropsychologist. Followers: 882
The Neurocritic. Blogger. Followers: 880
Jon Sutton. Editor of The Psychologist. Followers: 796
Karen Pine. Psychologist, author. Followers: 783
Uta Frith. Developmental neuropsychologist, autism expert. Followers: 730
Claudia Hammond. Radio presenter. Followers: 715
John Cacioppo. Psychologist, social neuroscientist. Followers: 705
Sarah-Jayne Blakemore. Cognitive neuroscientist. Followers: 691
Mark Batey. Creativity expert. Followers: 682
Rob Archer. Organisational psychologist. Followers: 680
Ben Hawkes. Psychologist, comedian. Followers: 679
Monica Whitty. Cyberpsychologist. Followers: 663
Charles Fernyhough. Developmental psychologist, author. Followers: 662
Marco Iacoboni. Neuroscientist, mirror neuron expert. Followers: 615
James Neill. Psychology lecturer. Followers: 590
Eran Katz. Grad student (tweets in Hebrew). Followers: 549
Rory O'Connor. Health psychologist, suicide researcher. Followers: 526
Tom Stafford. Psychologist, author. Followers: 494
Christopher H. Ramey. Psychologist. Followers: 485
Bruce Hutchison. Clinical psychologist. Followers: 465
Rachel Robinson. Child psychologist. Followers: 447
Manon Eileen. Clinical psychologist and criminologist. Followers: 442
Rebecca Symes. Sports psychologist. Followers: 427
Wray Herbert. Writer for APS, author. Followers: 417
Hilary Bruffell. Social psychologist. Followers: 412
Atle Dyregrov. Psychologist, expert in crisis psychology. Followers: 405
Steven Brownlow. Clinical and forensic psychologist. Followers: 405
Mike Garth. Sports psychologist. Followers: 402
Victoria Galbraith. Counselling psychologist. Followers: 389
Daniel Simons. Cognitive psychologist, author. Followers: 355
Daryl O'Connor. Health psychologist. Followers: 352
David Matsumoto. Psychologist and judoka. Followers: 326
Karen Franklin. Forensic psychologist. Followers: 299
Patrick Macartney. Psychologist and sociologist. Followers: 297
Caroline Watt. Parapsychologist. Followers: 296
CiarĂ¡n Mc Mahon. Psychologist. Followers: 283
Tim Byron. Music psychologist. Followers: 275
Voula Grand. Psychologist and writer. Followers: 273
Lorna Quandt. Grad student. Followers: 267
Bex Hewett. PhD student in occupational psychology. Followers: 261
Kevin McGrew. Intelligence expert. Followers: 259
Daniela O'Neill. Developmental psychologist. Followers: 245
Sean Nethercott. Psychologist. Followers: 243
Romeo Vitelli. Psychologist in private practice. Followers: 233
Andy Fugard. Cognitive scientist. Followers: 229
Erika Salomon. Grad student. Followers: 217
CoertVisser. Psychologist. Followers: 217
Jenna Condie. Environmental psychologist. Followers: 216
Astrid Kitti. Grad student. Followers: 203
Margarita Holmes. Psychologist and sex therapist. Followers: 203
Alex Fradera. Editor of BPS Occupational Digest. Followers: 194
Sue Hartley. Psychologist. Followers: 194
Johnrev Guilaran. Clinical psychologist trainee. Followers: 185
Janet Civitelli. Counselling psychologist. Followers: 175
Jon Simons. Cognitive scientist. Followers: 174
Ken Gilhooly. Cognitive psychologist. Followers: 166
Adrian Wale. Cognitive scientist, writer. Followers: 162
Sanja Dutina. Psychologist. Followers: 161
Gareth Morris. Grad student. Followers: 155
Talya Grumberg. Mental health counsellor. Followers: 155
Lila Chrysikou. Psychologist. Followers: 151
Ruthanna Gordon. Psychologist, sustainability expert. Followers: 151
Alex Birch. Business psychologist. Followers: 136
Craig Bertram. Grad student. Followers: 135
Suzanne Conboy-Hill. Clinical psychologist. Followers: 135
Simon Dymond. Behavioural neuroscientist. Followers: 130
Marc Scully. Social psychologist. Followers: 127
Mark Hoelterhoff. Experimental existential psychologist. Followers: 127
Nancy Hoffman. Neuropsychologist. Followers: 117
Valeschka Guerra. Psychology lecturer. Followers: 116
Emma Dunlop. Grad student. Followers: 115
Deb Halasz. Research psychologist. Followers: 112
Matteo Cantamesse. Social psychologist. Followers: 112
Catriona Morrison. Experimental psychologist. Followers: 107
Dylan Lopich. Clinical psychologist. Followers: 106
John Houser. School psychologist. Followers: 106
Arvid Kappas. Emotion researcher. Followers: 89
Andrew and Sabrina. Psychological scientists. Followers: 84
Simon Knight. Psychologist. Followers: 84
Peter Kinderman. Clinical psychologist. Followers: 83
Paul Hanges. Organisational psychologist. Followers: 83
John Hyland. Experimental psychologist. Followers: 82
Chelsea Walsh. Family and marriage therapist. Followers: 81
Kevin Friery. Psychologist, psychotherapist. Followers: 80
Gerald Guild. Psychologist, autism specialist. Followers: 78
Gillian Smith. Alcohol and drug researcher. Followers: 75
Jen Lewis. Grad student. Followers: 74
Scott Kaufman. Cognitive psychologist. Followers: 69
Jui Bhagwat. Child psychologist. Followers: 63
Tom Walton. Grad student. Followers: 61
Chris Brand. Cognitive psychologist in training. Followers: 59
Odette Beris. Psychologist and coach. Followers: 59
David Hughes. Psychologist. Followers: 53
Barry McGuinness. Psychologist, writer. Followers: 47
Caitlin Allison. Trainee counselling psychologist. Followers: 47
Philip Collier. Sport and positive psychologist. Followers: 40
David Yates. Grad student. Followers: 36
Alison Price. Occupational psychologist. Followers: 35
Sian Jones. Grad student. Followers: 31
Helen Jones. Clinical psychologist. Followers: 29
John Taylor. Cognitive psychologist. Followers: 23
Kathryn Newns. Clinical psychologist. Followers: 21
Lorraine Hope. Cognitive psychologist. Followers: 10
Victoria Mason. Psychology lecturer. Followers: 9

Thanks to Ben Watson for updating the follower counts. If you'd like to be added to future iterations of the list please add your full name and Twitter tag to comments. Future additions to the list must be fully-qualified psychologists. Also, we're restricting the list to individuals, so no organisations please. 





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Educational Psychologist

Tuesday, March 08, 2011

Saturday, March 05, 2011

Educational neuroscience: Mind Brain and Education




I just stumbled upon a new journal that appears worthy to monitor. It is a journal dealing with the field of educational neuroscience--Mind Brain and Education. Below are a select sample of article abstracts.


Blair, C. (2010). Going Down to the Crossroads: Neuroendocrinology, Developmental Psychobiology, and Prospects for Research at the Intersection of Neuroscience and Education. Mind Brain and Education, 4(4), 182-187.

The relation of stress hormones and activity in stress response systems to the development of aspects of cognition and behavior important for educational achievement and attainment is examined from the perspective of the developmental psychobiological model. It is proposed that research in neuroendocrinology supports three general conclusions, namely (1) that there is a neuroscientifically definable optimal level of stress arousal in children against which various curricula and teaching and learning activities can be examined; (2) that consideration of the time course of stress arousal indicates that optimal levels of stress arousal are temporally limited and can be matched to specific instructional activities; and (3) that alterations to stress response systems through processes of allostasis and allostatic load, particularly for children facing early psychosocial disadvantage, can impair the flexible regulation of stress response systems needed for effective learning in school.



Fischer, K. W., Goswami, U., & Geake, J. (2010). The Future of Educational Neuroscience. Mind Brain and Education, 4(2), 68-80

The primary goal of the emerging field of educational neuroscience and the broader movement called Mind, Brain, and Education is to join biology with cognitive science, development, and education so that education can be grounded more solidly in research on learning and teaching. To avoid misdirection, the growing worldwide movement needs to avoid the many myths and distortions in popular conceptions of brain and genetics. It should instead focus on integrating research with practice to create useful evidence that illuminates the brain and genetic bases as well as social and cultural influences on learning and teaching. Scientists and educators need to collaborate to build a strong research foundation for analyzing the “black box” of biological and cognitive processes that underpin learning.


Newcombe, N. S., & Frick, A. (2010). Early Education for Spatial Intelligence: Why, What, and How. Mind Brain and Education, 4(3), 102-111

Spatial representation and thinking have evolutionary importance for any mobile organism. In addition, they help reasoning in domains that are not obviously spatial, for example, through the use of graphs and diagrams. This article reviews the literature suggesting that mental spatial transformation abilities, while present in some precursory form in infants, toddlers, and preschool children, also undergo considerable development and show important individual differences, which are malleable. These findings provide the basis for thinking about how to promote spatial thinking in preschools, at home, and in children's play. Integrating spatial content into formal and informal instruction could not only improve spatial functioning in general but also reduce differences related to gender and socioeconomic status that may impede full participation in a technological society.


Sylvan, L. J., & Christodoulou, J. A. (2010). Understanding the Role of Neuroscience in Brain Based Products: A Guide for Educators and Consumers. Mind Brain and Education, 4(1), 1-7.

This article describes an experiment utilizing a research and development strategy to design and implement an innovative school for the future. The development of Cramim Elementary School was a joint effort of researchers from Tel-Aviv University and the staff of the school. The design stage involved constructing a new theoretical framework that defined school as a knowledge system, based on the state of the art, interdisciplinary study of the nature of humans, and the nature of knowledge. A new school design emerged based on this theoretical framework and the school was opened in 1995. Action research followed for 8 years and the results indicated that the school has emerged as a learning organization and successfully integrated knowledge technologies into the learning processes of both students and teachers. Differentiated teaching strategy resulted in a significant increase in achievements (+11% in maths, literacy, and science; +10% in literacy in kindergarten; persistence of higher achievement in junior high schools). The greatest beneficiaries were low-achieving students. As the school is a highly complex system, individual variables contributing to the increased effectiveness could not be isolated. The article's conclusion is that experimental schools are a productive strategy to bring about changes, but unless these schools are part and parcel of the culture of the mainstream education system culture, they are destined to remain isolated cases.


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Educational Psychologist

Friday, March 04, 2011

FYiPOST: PEBS Neuroethics Roundup from JHU Guest Blogger

Last Edition's Most Popular Article: Moral enhancement and pro-social behavior, Journal of Medical Ethics In The Popular Press: Enzyme can strengthen memories, Nature News Go Easy on Yourself, a New Wave of Research Urges, New York Times Recreational Drug Creates...





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