Wednesday, December 30, 2009

Neuroethics and Law round up

As usual, a plethora of interesting story links

http://kolber.typepad.com/ethics_law_blog/2009/12/pebs-neuroethics-roundup-from-jhu-guest-blogger-2.html

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Tuesday, December 29, 2009

iPost: The Edison Brainmeter

Thanks to MIND HACKS for interesting historical tidbit

http://www.mindhacks.com/blog/2009/12/the_edison_brainmete.html

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Wednesday, December 23, 2009

Video game playing improves cognitive speed with no accuracy decrement: Research synthesis reprot

There has been lots of press and interest in the impact of playing video games and using various brain fitness programs to improve cognitive functioning.  In this context, I found the following meta-analysis based article of particular interest.  Across different types of tasks, expert video game players not only increased their cognitive reaction time but also improved their accuracy of performance.  The finding of no negative "speed-accuracy" trade-off is an important finding, suggesting that video game playing may result in quicker processing speed without a increase in accuracy.

Dye, M. W. G., Green, C. S., & Bavelier, D. (2009). Increasing Speed of Processing With Action Video Games.
Current Directions in Psychological Science, 18(6), 321-326.

ABSTRACT

In many everyday situations, speed is of the essence. However, fast decisions typically mean more mistakes. To this day, it remains unknown whether reaction times can be reduced with appropriate training, within one individual, across a range of tasks, and without compromising accuracy. Here we review evidence that the very act of playing action video games significantly reduces reaction times without sacrificing accuracy. Critically, this increase in speed is observed across various tasks beyond game situations. Video gaming may therefore provide an efficient training regimen to induce a general speeding of perceptual reaction

Comments from article:
The increased speed of processing noted in VGPs is often viewed as a ‘‘trigger-happy’’ behavior, in which VGPs respond faster but make more anticipatory errors (responding incorrectly because they do not wait for enough information to become available). Available research suggests this is not the case. First, the meta-analysis above reveals that VGPs have equivalent accuracy to NVGPs in the face of an 11% decrease in RTs. Second, a more direct evaluation of impulsivity using the Test of Variables of Attention (T.O.V.A.s) indicates equivalent performance in VGPs and NVGPs.
Although earlier studies typically used speeded RT tasks, more recent studies of action-video-game players have focused on accuracy measures. This choice was motivated by the difficulty of making fair comparisons regarding cognitive processes across populations that have large differences in how quickly they make their responses. This problem is well acknowledged in the aging literature, and we refer the reader to Madden, Pierce, and Allen (1996) for a comprehensive discussion of the issue.
Actionvideo-game training may therefore prove to be a helpful training regimen for providing a marked increase in speed of information processing to individuals with slower-than-normal speed of processing, such as the elderly or victims of brain trauma
While the evidence reviewed here shows that these improvements generalize to a wide range of perceptual and attentional tasks, the extent of this generalization remains unknown. Because available work has focused on visual tasks, there is no information about generalization to other modalities, such as audition or touch. Similarly, because the focus has so far been on relatively fast tasks requiring decisions between just two alternatives (with RTs less than 2,000 milliseconds), it remains unknown whether more cognitively demanding tasks would benefit in any way.

A second important goal for future work is to gain a clearer understanding of the characteristics of the action-video-game play experience that favor performance enhancement. Much of what is currently known is descriptive (for instance, that fast-paced and visually complex games promote greater levels of learning than do slower games; see Cohen, Green, & Bavelier, 2007); there is a clear need to move toward more explanatory accounts.

Finally, most of the games found to enhance performance are unsuitable for children in terms of their content and difficult for elderly gamers in terms of the dexterity of response and visual acuity required. Identifying which aspects of the games are relevant will allow the development of games that have a wide range of suitability and accessibility that can be used in clinical as well as educational applications. As with any research endeavor, a combination of basic theoretical research combined with evidence-led practical applications is the most likely to produce tangible results.


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Sunday, December 20, 2009

NIMH funded neurofeedback ADHD study -- does it impact the brain clock?


Interesting story in the Washington Post regarding a well-designed study being funded by NIMH re: the efficacy of neurofeedback.  I'm anxious to see the results, as I've hypothesized that the apparent efficacy of rhythm-based metronome therapies (e.g., Interactive Metronome) for ADHD operate in a similar manner as they provides constant and immediate performance feedback based on rhythm motor synchronization.  I've speculated that these forms of treatment may be improving the synchronization of information across different parts of the brain via the "fine tuning" of the brain clock (the temporal resolution hypothesis).  In particular, I've hypothesized about these methods improving the neurocognitive constructs of executive selective attention and working memory.  

I've outlined the foundation for my hypothesis in some on-line PPT slide shows that can be accessed on the blog sidebar.

A couple past posts of relevance can be found here, here, and here.

Conflict of interest disclosure:  I'm on the Scientific Advisory Board for Interactive Metronome.

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iPost: Neuroethics round up

Great neuroscience round up at NEUROETHICS LAW blog http://bit.ly/7fY3QH


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Friday, December 18, 2009

iPost: FYI Five laws of human natur

From the NEW SCIENTIST.

http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn18301-five-laws-of-human-nature.html?DCMP=OTC-rss&nsref=brain


Kevin McGrew PhD
Educational/School Psych.
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Thursday, December 17, 2009

Its about "timing"--not "speed"

Interesting post at Mind Hacks re: article in Discover Magazine that discusses scientific efforts to understand the speed of human nerve transmission.  Of particular interest is the comment that efficient human performance may not be so much about speed...but may be more related to timing. 

Timing may be the key---not speed.
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Tuesday, December 15, 2009

Brain clock and Huntingtons disorder

Although based on animal studies this study is yet another (of many) linking temporal processing, mental or interval timing, the brain clock and a number of clinical disorders.  This time Hinringtons--again

The primary mission of Behavioral
Neuroscience is to publish original research papers in the broad field of the biological bases of behavior.

Disrupted temporal control in the R6/2 mouse model of Huntington's disease.

Tue, Dec 15 2009 12:53 AM 
by Balci, Fuat; Day, Mark; Rooney, Aislinn; Brunner, Dani

Huntington's disease is characterized by corticostriatal dysfunction and degeneration of the striatum with progressive loss of the medium spiny neurons. These circuits are important for instrumental responding, interval timing, and temporal control over motor output. We investigated the acquisition of timed operant responding in two R6/2 Huntington's Disease models, differing in CAG repeat length and genetic background (115 and 250 CAG repeats, and a mixed CBAxC57 or pure C57 background) and their corresponding wild type controls using the peak procedure. Both mouse lines exhibited similar response control deficits. In unreinforced peak trials, mice either did not learn to terminate an ongoing response past reinforcement time or required more trials to acquisition compared to the wild type mice. While transgenic and wild type mice did not exhibit differences in temporal accuracy, response curves were flatter in transgenic mice, suggesting decreased temporal control over operant responding. The results are discussed in terms of the neurobiology of interval timing, instrumental responding, and the neuropathology of HD and R6/2 mice. 



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Thursday, December 10, 2009

iPost: Mental Earworms

Thanks to MIND HACKS

http://www.mindhacks.com/blog/2009/12/cant_get_you_out_of.html


Kevin McGrew PhD
Educational/School Psych.
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Tuesday, December 08, 2009

The beautiful mind interviewed

Thanks to Mind Hacks for this post about John Nash.

http://www.mindhacks.com/blog/2009/12/john_nash_a_beautif.html


Kevin McGrew PhD
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iPost: Encephalon brain blog carnival # 79

http://www.mindhacks.com/blog/2009/12/encephalon_79_ends_t.html

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Sunday, December 06, 2009

More research on cerebellum and mental timing


Tadashi Yamazaki1, 3 and Shigeru TanakaContact Information

(1) Laboratory for Motor Learning Control, RIKEN Brain Science Institute, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako Saitama, 351-0198, Japan
(2) Laboratory for Visual Neurocomputing, RIKEN Brain Science Institute, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako Saitama, 351-0198, Japan
(3) Present address: Strategic Planning Unit, RIKEN BSI-TOYOTA Collaboration Center, RIKEN Brain Science Institute, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako Saitama,351-0198, Japan

Received: 30 June 2008  Accepted:7 May 2009  Published online: 5 June 2009

Abstract  A long-standing question in neuroscience is how the brain controls movement that requires precisely timed muscle activations. Studies using Pavlovian delay eyeblink conditioning provide good insight into this question. In delay eyeblink conditioning, which is believed to involve the cerebellum, a subject learns an interstimulus interval (ISI) between the onsets of a conditioned stimulus (CS) such as a tone and an unconditioned stimulus such as an airpuff to the eye. After a conditioning phase, the subject's eyes automatically close or blink when the ISI time has passed after CS onset. This timing information is thought to be represented in some way in the cerebellum. Several computational models of the cerebellum have been proposed to explain the mechanisms of time representation, and they commonly point to the granular layer network. This article will review these computational models and discuss the possible computational power of the cerebellum.

Keywords  Cerebellum - Time - Delay eyeblink conditioning - Neural network models - Recurrent network - Granular layer


Contact InformationShigeru Tanaka
Email: shigeru@riken.jp




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Tuesday, December 01, 2009

Research byte: Ga (auditory sound processing) and cognitive development: Auditory scaffolding hypothosis


I ran across this very interest article in one of my favorite journals for short and concise up-to-date summaries of contemporary cognitive research.  Given the apparent role of temporal and serial processing in mental timing behavior (IQ Brain Clock), it reinforces the notion that auditory processing (Ga) is a primary and important cognitive mechanism for intellectual and cognitive growth.....according to these authors, vis-a-vis providing a bootstrap or scaffolding mechanism for the development of critical cognitive functions.

Conway,C.  Pisoni, D., & Kronenberger, W. (2009). The Importance of Sound for Cognitive Sequencing Abilities: The Auditory Scaffolding Hypothesis.  Current Directions in Psychological Science, 18(5), 275-179 (click here to view

ABSTRACT
Sound is inherently a temporal and sequential signal. Experience with sound therefore may help bootstrap— that is, provide a kind of ‘‘scaffolding’’ for—the development of general cognitive abilities related to representing temporal or sequential patterns. Accordingly, the absence of sound early in development may result in disturbances to these sequencing skills. In support of this hypothesis, we present two types of findings. First, normalhearing adults do best on sequencing tasks when the sense of hearing, rather than sight, can be used. Second, recent findings suggest that deaf children have disturbances on exactly these same kinds of tasks that involve learning and manipulation of serial-order information. We suggest that sound provides an ‘‘auditory scaffolding’’ for time and serial-order behavior, possibly mediated through neural connections between the temporal and frontal lobes of the brain. Under conditions of auditory deprivation, auditory scaffolding is absent, resulting in neural reorganization and a disturbance to cognitive sequencing abilities.


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Monday, November 30, 2009

iBlogging mobile post: Aging training and the brain lit review


Cindy LustigContact Information, Priti Shah2, Rachael Seidler3 and Patricia A. Reuter-Lorenz1

(1) Department of Psychology, University of Michigan, 530 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1043, USA
(2) Departments of Psychology and Combined Program in Education and Psychology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, USA
(3) Department of Psychology and School of Kinesiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, USA

Received: 12 June 2009  Accepted:12 October 2009  Published online: 30 October 2009

Abstract  As the population ages, the need for effective methods to maintain or even improve older adults' cognitive performance becomes increasingly pressing. Here we provide a brief review of the major intervention approaches that have been the focus of past research with healthy older adults (strategy training, multi-modal interventions, cardiovascular exercise, and process-based training), and new approaches that incorporate neuroimaging. As outcome measures, neuroimaging data on intervention-related changes in volume, structural integrity; and functional activation can provide important insights into the nature and duration of an intervention's effects. Perhaps even more intriguingly, several recent studies have used neuroimaging data as a guide to identify core cognitive processes that can be trained in one task with effective transfer to other tasks that share the same underlying processes. Although many open questions remain, this research has greatly increased our understanding of how to promote successful aging of cognition and the brain.

Keywords  Training - fmri - Healthy aging - Brain - Neuroimaging - Cardiovascular - Cognitive intervention


Contact InformationCindy Lustig
Email: clustig@umich.edu
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Neuropsychology Review, Vol. 19, Issue 4 - New Issue Alert




Monday, November 30

Dear Valued Customer,
We are pleased to deliver your requested table of contents alert for Neuropsychology Review.

Volume 19 Number 4 is now available on SpringerLink

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In this issue:
Preface
Decline and Compensation in Aging Brain and Cognition: Promises and Constraints
Author(s)Naftali Raz
DOI10.1007/s11065-009-9122-1
Online sinceNovember 20, 2009
Page411 - 414

Review
Cerebral White Matter Integrity and Cognitive Aging: Contributions from Diffusion Tensor Imaging
Author(s)David J. Madden, Ilana J. Bennett & Allen W. Song
DOI10.1007/s11065-009-9113-2
Online sinceAugust 25, 2009
Page415 - 435

Review
Beta-Amyloid Deposition and the Aging Brain
Author(s)Karen M. Rodrigue, Kristen M. Kennedy & Denise C. Park
DOI10.1007/s11065-009-9118-x
Online sinceNovember 12, 2009
Page436 - 450

Review
The Impact of Genetic Research on our Understanding of Normal Cognitive Ageing: 1995 to 2009
Author(s)Antony Payton
DOI10.1007/s11065-009-9116-z
Online sinceSeptember 19, 2009
Page451 - 477

Review
Aging and Spatial Navigation: What Do We Know and Where Do We Go?
Author(s)Scott D. Moffat
DOI10.1007/s11065-009-9120-3
Online sinceNovember 20, 2009
Page478 - 489

Review
Implicit Learning in Aging: Extant Patterns and New Directions
Author(s)Anna Rieckmann & Lars B├Ąckman
DOI10.1007/s11065-009-9117-y
Online sinceOctober 09, 2009
Page490 - 503

Review
Aging, Training, and the Brain: A Review and Future Directions
Author(s)Cindy Lustig, Priti Shah, Rachael Seidler & Patricia A. Reuter-Lorenz
DOI10.1007/s11065-009-9119-9
Online sinceOctober 30, 2009
Page504 - 522

EDITORIAL POSTSCRIPT
Cognitive Aging Research: An Exciting Time for a Maturing Field
Author(s)Molly V. Wagster
DOI10.1007/s11065-009-9121-2
Online sinceNovember 22, 2009
Page523 - 525
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Wednesday, November 25, 2009

iBlogging mobile: Use of fmri evidence in capital punishment case

Click link for story. Not an Atkins MR case but interesting
development of brain scan and expert testimony to attempt to establish
brain-based psychopathology diagnosis for defendant.

http://blogs.sciencemag.org/scienceinsider/2009/11/fmri-evidence-u.html


Kevin McGrew PhD
Educational/School Psych.
IAP (www.iapsych.com)

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Tuesday, November 24, 2009

20th Annual Butters-Kaplan West Coast Neuropsychology Conference - SAVE THE DATE]


Register Today

20th Annual Butters-Kaplan West Coast Neuropsychology Conference
Advances in Pediatric Neuropsychology:
From Toddlers Through School-Aged Children


March 25-28, 2010

Dear Colleague,

As most of you have probably heard, the neuropsychology community suffered a deep loss with the passing of Dr. Edith Kaplan on September 3, 2009, at the age of 85. At the 20th anniversary of the West Coast Neuropsychology Conference, we will honor the life and works of Edith as part of a program on child neuropsychology that she and I were in the middle of organizing when Edith succumbed to complications related to heart surgery.

The internationally renowned speakers at the 2010 conference will present their latest findings on the assessment and remediation of cognitive and behavioral impairments in pre-school and school-aged children. The speakers will (a) emphasize practical tools that clinicians and educators can use to provide comprehensive assessments and remediation strategies for children with neurocognitive deficits; and (b) highlight the role that Edith's work played in their particular line of research. This year's conference will also feature a pre-conference workshop on a new set of assessment tools – the Advanced Clinical Solutions for the WAIS-IV and WMS-IV – which provides new subtests, demographic-corrected norms, and effort measures designed for patients between the ages of 16 and 89. Thus, the preconference workshop on Thursday evening will be in the area of adolescent and adult neuropsychology, and the main conference from Friday to Sunday will be in the area of child neuropsychology. The program is intended for neuropsychologists, clinical psychologists, school psychologists, speech therapists, learning specialists, educators, psychiatrists, neurologists, and other interested health professionals.

I cordially invite you to join us for this exciting and informative program and look forward to hosting you in San Diego, America's finest city.

Sincerely,
Dean C. Delis, PhD
Conference Director

This activity has been approved for AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™.

For more information and to register online,
visit http://cme.ucsd.edu/neuro




UC San Diego School of Medicine
Continuing Medical Education
9500 Gilman Drive, MC0617, La Jolla, CA 92093-0617

Phone: (858) 534-3940 • Toll-Free: (888) 229-OCME (6263) • Fax: (858) 534-7672
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Monday, November 23, 2009

Saturday, November 14, 2009

Personal tidbit: Main office of blogmaster

Just a personal note. I work primarily out of my home office--this is
it. You can never have enough screens! My other offices are coffee
shops. Life has blessed the blogmaster.

Thursday, November 12, 2009

New Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience journal

http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/L05_426.cws_home/main


Kevin McGrew PhD
Educational/School Psych.
IAP (www.iapsych.com)

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Neurobiology of language conf in Chicago

Click link for conference info

http://www.nlc2009.angularis.org/


Kevin McGrew PhD
Educational/School Psych.
IAP (www.iapsych.com)

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Tuesday, November 10, 2009

Thursday, November 05, 2009

Follow-up to brain "time stamp" reseach

I previously made a brief post about interesting research done in primates that suggested that the brain uses a "time stamp" method to keep track of the time of events.  I've now located a copy of the research article published in PNAS (National Academy of Sciences) and now provide a link to those who really want to read the actual (but very technical) research report.

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Wednesday, November 04, 2009

More on cognitive neuroenhancement issues

Thanks to BIOETHICS FORUM for this post

http://www.thehastingscenter.org/Bioethicsforum/Post.aspx?id=4046


Kevin McGrew PhD
Educational/School Psych.
IAP (www.iapsych.com)

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Sunday, November 01, 2009

Brain injury conferences

Thanks to BI BLOG for this conference list

http://braininjury.blogs.com/braininjury/2009/11/november-brain-injury-conferences.html


Kevin McGrew PhD
Educational/School Psych.
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Thursday, October 29, 2009

Brief history of neuroscience

Thanks to MOUSE TRAP for the link

http://the-mouse-trap.com/2009/10/29/a-brief-history-of-neuroscience/


Kevin McGrew PhD
Educational/School Psych.
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Monday, October 26, 2009

Meditation and attention

Thanks to MIND BLOG for this post. I've often wondered if some of the
improved cognitive functioning found after using one of the various
brain fitness programs isn't due to the program(s) resulting in
subjects getting "focused in a zone" much like meditation.

http://mindblog.dericbownds.net/2009/10/meditation-training-can-enhance.html


Kevin McGrew PhD
Educational/School Psych.
IAP (www.iapsych.com)

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Sunday, October 25, 2009

Cup(s) of Joe good for your brain?

Thanks to SHARP BRAINS for making ne feel good about my love for coffee

http://www.sharpbrains.com/blog/2009/10/24/does-coffee-boost-brain-cognitive-functions-over-time/


Kevin McGrew PhD
Educational/School Psych.
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Friday, October 23, 2009

Time of the essence

Interesting post at MIND HACKS

http://www.mindhacks.com/blog/2009/10/time_is_of_the_essen.html


Kevin McGrew PhD
Educational/School Psych.
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ResearchBytes 10-23-09: Rhythm production and reading/dyslexia


Articles that caught my eye during my weekly search of a wide range of professional literature.

Dellatolas, G., Watier, L., LeNormand, M. T., Lubart, T., & ChevrieMuller, C. (2009). Rhythm Reproduction in Kindergarten, Reading Performance at Second Grade, and Developmental Dyslexia Theories. Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, 24(6), 555-563.
Temporal processing deficit could be associated with a specific difficulty in learning to read. In 1951, Stambak provided preliminary evidence that children with dyslexia performed less well than good readers in reproduction of 21 rhythmic patterns. Stambak's task was administered to 1,028 French children aged 5–6 years. The score distribution (from 0 to 21) was quasi-normal, with some children failing completely and other performing perfectly. In second grade, reading was assessed in 695 of these children. Kindergarten variables explained 26% of the variance of the reading score at second grade. The Stambak score was strongly and linearly related to reading performance in second grade, after partialling out performance on other tasks (oral repetition, attention, and visuo-spatial tasks) and socio-cultural level. Findings are discussed in relation to perceptual, cerebellar, intermodal, and attention-related theories of developmental dyslexia. It is concluded that simple rhythm reproduction tasks in kindergarten are predictive of later reading performance.

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Tuesday, October 20, 2009

More on neural enhancement

Thanks to PTJ blog

http://gaggio.blogspirit.com/archive/2009/10/20/tweaking-your-neurons.html


Kevin McGrew PhD
Educational/School Psych.
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Brain blog carnival: Encephalon 77

http://www.mindhacks.com/blog/2009/10/encephalon_77_teams_.html


Kevin McGrew PhD
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Time Doc Bytes: Two new exciting brain-based brain clock research studies


Two very interesting research studies reported this past week.

The first used a rare procedure (implanting electrodes in Broca's area of the brain) provides useful information on brain mechanisms involved in the speed, timing and sequence of language behaviors.

The second, based on research with primates, is very intriguing as it suggest the use of a "brain stamp" mechanism for keeping time of events.   Interestingly, and consistent with considerable research posted at this blog before, the focus was on certain brain regions/mechanisms (prefrontal cortex; straitum; dopamine), and implications were mentioned for Parkinson's disease treatment.

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Tuesday, October 06, 2009

Sunday, October 04, 2009

Personal choice and ethical/moral issues in self-cognitive enhancement



Interesting topic (personal choice, ethics, and moral issues in self-cognitive enhacement) discussed in a new Neuroethics article (Automony and coercion in academic "cognitive enhancement" using methlphenidate:  Perspective of key stakeholders)

Abstract

There is mounting evidence that methylphenidate (MPH; Ritalin) is being used by healthy college students to improve concentration, alertness, and academic performance. One of the key concerns associated with such use of pharmaceuticals is the degree of freedom individuals have to engage in or abstain from cognitive enhancement (CE). From a pragmatic perspective, careful examination of the ethics of acts and contexts in which they arise includes considering coercion and social pressures to enhance cognition. We were interested in understanding how university students, parents of university students, and healthcare providers viewed autonomy and coercion in CE using MPH. We found that perspectives converged on the belief that CE is a matter of personal and individual choice. Perspectives also converged on the existence of tremendous social pressures to perform and succeed. Parents emphasized personal responsibility and accountability for CE choices, and expressed feelings of worry, sadness and fear about CE. Students emphasized the importance of personal integrity in CE, expressed tolerance for personal choices of others, and highlighted the challenge that CE poses to maintaining one’s personal integrity. Healthcare providers emphasized the health consequences of CE. These results illustrate: (1) the importance of understanding how context is viewed in relation to perspectives on autonomous choice; (2) the limitations of individualistic libertarian approaches that do not consider social context; and (3) the ethical implications of public health interventions in a value-laden debate where perspectives diverge.

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Wednesday, September 30, 2009

Playing in NFL increases chances of dementia

From BRAIN INJURY blog

http://bit.ly/hYYcx

Kevin McGrew PhD
Educational/School Psych.
IAP (www.iapsych.com)

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Monday, September 28, 2009

Need for balanced right/left brain training!

I've not read the report so this is just a pass along FYI

http://eideneurolearningblog.blogspot.com/2009/09/watch-how-you-train-your-brain.html


Kevin McGrew PhD
Educational/School Psych.
IAP (www.iapsych.com)

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Friday, September 25, 2009

The "bottleneck" problem

Very interesting post at DI blog about research on the "bottleneck"
problem in cognition. Follow link below.

http://scienceblogs.com/developingintelligence/2009/09/active_monitoring_in_the_psych.php


Kevin McGrew PhD
Educational/School Psych.
IAP (www.iapsych.com)

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Friday, September 18, 2009

Arts training improves cognition via attention: More support for IQ brain clock fine tunning hypothesis

I just read an interesting post at Cerebrum regarding the impact of training in the arts and improved cognition, hypothesized to occur due to improvement in attention.

I find the research very consistent with the proposed link between the mental timing (IQ Brain Clock) and improved cognitive performance, which has been hypothesized to impact the same basic cognitive functions (esp., controlled executive attention and executive functions).  I've blogged and PPT'd extensively at this blog, esp. with re: to neurotechnologies that focus on synchronized metronome tapping, a technology that deals with rhythm perception and production.

In my opinion, the research discussed at the Cerebrum adds to the growing literature suggesting a link between "fine tuning the temporal resolution of the brain clock" and improved cognitive efficiency.  Amy Vega and I recently published a research review report supporting the link between brain rhythm-based treatments and improvement in a diverse array of human performance domains. 

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