Sunday, January 21, 2018

Creative people have better-connected brains, research finds

I have previously posted an FYI about this research.  This summary by Jon Lieff is excellent.



Creative people have better-connected brains, research finds

From Twitter, a Flipboard magazine by Jon Lieff MD

Seemingly countless self-help books and seminars tell you to tap into the right side of your brain to stimulate creativity. But forget the…

Read it on Flipboard

Read it on medicalxpress.com




Tuesday, January 16, 2018

Myelin Facilitation of Whole Brain Neuroplasticity

An excellent summary article

Myelin Facilitation of Whole Brain Neuroplasticity

Neuroplasticty is the way a brain makes lasting alterations of its own circuits when responding to experience. A vast array of mechanisms have been…

Read it on Flipboard

Read it on jonlieffmd.com




Creative thinkers' brains show signature pattern of neural connectivity, new study finds



Creative thinkers' brains show signature pattern of neural connectivity, new study finds

From Science and Health, a Flipboard magazine by IBTimes UK

In case of creative thinkers, researchers noted a better connection between 3 crucial parts of the brain.…

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Read it on ibtimes.co.uk




Friday, January 05, 2018

Meta-analysis of action video game impact on perceptual, attentional, and cognitive skills.


Meta-analysis of action video game impact on perceptual, attentional, and cognitive skills.


Journal ArticleDatabase: PsycARTICLES


Bediou, Benoit Adams, Deanne M. Mayer, Richard E. Tipton, Elizabeth Green, C. Shawn Bavelier, Daphne

Citation

Bediou, B., Adams, D. M., Mayer, R. E., Tipton, E., Green, C. S., & Bavelier, D. (2018). Meta-analysis of action video game impact on perceptual, attentional, and cognitive skills. Psychological Bulletin, 144(1), 77-110. 
http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/bul0000130

Abstract

The ubiquity of video games in today's society has led to significant interest in their impact on the brain and behavior and in the possibility of harnessing games for good. The present meta-analyses focus on one specific game genre that has been of particular interest to the scientific community—action video games, and cover the period 2000–2015. To assess the long-lasting impact of action video game play on various domains of cognition, we first consider cross-sectional studies that inform us about the cognitive profile of habitual action video game players, and document a positive average effect of about half a standard deviation (g = 0.55). We then turn to long-term intervention studies that inform us about the possibility of causally inducing changes in cognition via playing action video games, and show a smaller average effect of a third of a standard deviation (g = 0.34). Because only intervention studies using other commercially available video game genres as controls were included, this latter result highlights the fact that not all games equally impact cognition. Moderator analyses indicated that action video game play robustly enhances the domains of top-down attention and spatial cognition, with encouraging signs for perception. Publication bias remains, however, a threat with average effects in the published literature estimated to be 30% larger than in the full literature. As a result, we encourage the field to conduct larger cohort studies and more intervention studies, especially those with more than 30 hours of training. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved)


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Kevin McGrew, PhD
Educational Psychologist
Director, Institute for Applied Psychometrics
IAP
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Monday, January 01, 2018

The Neuroscience of Intelligence: An Interview with Richard Haier



The Neuroscience of Intelligence: An Interview with Richard Haier

Richard Haier is a Professor Emeritus at the University of California Irvine and is the author of the Neuroscience of Intelligence…

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Read it on quillette.com




Thursday, December 28, 2017

Yes, the ADHD Brain Can Be Trained to Improve



Yes, the ADHD Brain Can Be Trained to Improve

From BiPolar, Depression & ADHD, a Flipboard magazine by Rob Waldrip

But can people with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder – often referred to as a brain-based disorder – also train their brain to improve? Every…

Read it on Flipboard

Read it on msn.com



******************************************************
Kevin McGrew, PhD
Educational Psychologist
Director, Institute for Applied Psychometrics
IAP
******************************************************

Wednesday, December 13, 2017

Action video games expand the brain's cognitive abilities



Action video games expand the brain's cognitive abilities

From Mind, a Flipboard magazine by Devon Briggs

The human brain is malleable – it learns and adapts. Numerous research studies have focused on the impact of action video games on the brain…

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Read it on psypost.org




Talking to yourself? Here’s the science behind that little voice in your head



Talking to yourself? Here's the science behind that little voice in your head

The brain considers talking to ourselves in our heads to be very similar to speaking our thoughts out loud. And the…

Read it on Flipboard

Read it on irishexaminer.com




Friday, December 08, 2017

Scientists create atlas of developing human brain, the most complex human organ



Scientists create atlas of developing human brain, the most complex human organ

From Mind the Gap, a Flipboard magazine by Lawrence Villegas

Everybody likes travelling around the world but what if we tell you that now you can travel through human brains as…

Read it on Flipboard

Read it on indiatoday.intoday.in




Sunday, November 26, 2017

How do the brains of intelligent people work?



How do the brains of intelligent people work?

From NEUROSCIENCE, a Flipboard magazine by Glossex

People with a higher-than-average intelligence level have brains that are "wired" in a different way, researchers say. A new study suggests that…

Read it on Flipboard

Read it on medicalnewstoday.com




Wednesday, November 22, 2017

DARPA Is Spending $65 Million to Meld Mind and Machine



DARPA Is Spending $65 Million to Meld Mind and Machine

The U.S. defense agency that specializes in "out-there" science and technology endeavors is on a quest to bridge the gap between brain and…

Read it on Flipboard

Read it on blogs.discovermagazine.com




Fronto-parietal structural connectivity in childhood predicts development of functional connectivity and reasoning ability: a large-scale longitudinal investigation



Fronto-parietal structural connectivity in childhood predicts development of functional connectivity and reasoning ability: a large-scale longitudinal investigation

Read it on Flipboard

Read it on jneurosci.org




Friday, November 17, 2017

Can brain training reduce dementia risk? Despite new research, the jury is still out



Can brain training reduce dementia risk? Despite new research, the jury is still out

From The Guardian, a Flipboard magazine by The Guardian

There are good reasons to be cautious about a new study claiming computer-based training can reduce the risk of…

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Read it on theguardian.com




Dementia breakthrough? Brain-training game 'significantly reduces risk'



Dementia breakthrough? Brain-training game 'significantly reduces risk'

From Brain, a Flipboard magazine by tommysclee

A recent study has been hailed as a "breakthrough" in dementia prevention, after finding that a brain-training exercise can…

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Read it on medicalnewstoday.com




Wednesday, November 15, 2017

How emotions influence our internal clock



How emotions influence our internal clock

Human beings have an internal clock that enables the subconscious perception and estimation of time periods. A research team under Dr. Roland Thomaschke of…

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Read it on medicalxpress.com




Monday, November 13, 2017

Memory complaints and cognitive decline: Data from the GuidAge study



Memory complaints and cognitive decline: Data from the GuidAge study

From THE SCIENCE OF My LIFE, a Flipboard magazine by duskdiver

A memory complaint, also called Subjective Cognitive Decline (SCD), is a subjective disorder that appears to be relatively common,…

Read it on Flipboard

Read it on eurekalert.org



******************************************************
Kevin McGrew, PhD
Educational Psychologist
Director, Institute for Applied Psychometrics
IAP
******************************************************

Neurons are seen exploding across the brain "like fireworks" in the most detailed map ever made



Neurons are seen exploding across the brain "like fireworks" in the most detailed map ever made

From Brain Philosophy, a Flipboard magazine by Sandra Clark

Beyond teaching us more about the structure of the brain, these maps could help unlock some of the…

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Read it on alphr.com




Sunday, November 12, 2017

Brain imaging reveals brain stem alterations in children with autism



Brain imaging reveals brain stem alterations in children with autism

From Brain/Vision, a Flipboard magazine by CinemaoftheMind

Children with autism show different patterns of connectivity than controls do in brain stem regions associated with balance.…

Read it on Flipboard

Read it on spectrumnews.org




Brain imaging reveals brain stem alterations in children with autism



Brain imaging reveals brain stem alterations in children with autism

From Brain/Vision, a Flipboard magazine by CinemaoftheMind

Children with autism show different patterns of connectivity than controls do in brain stem regions associated with balance.…

Read it on Flipboard

Read it on spectrumnews.org




Friday, November 10, 2017

Research Byte: Is General Intelligence Little More Than the Speed of Higher-Order Processing?

Although a small sample, this is still and interesting study. The results are consistent with the continued nexus of the g, Gf, Gwm, attentional control and speed of higher order processing (especially P300 in ERP’s), white matter tract integrity and the PFIT model of intelligence as well as the recent process overlap theory (POT) of g.

Click on images to enlarge









Article link.

Anna-Lena Schubert, Dirk Hagemann, and Gidon T. Frischkorn Heidelberg University

ABSTRACT

Individual differences in the speed of information processing have been hypothesized to give rise to individual differences in general intelligence. Consistent with this hypothesis, reaction times (RTs) and latencies of event-related potential have been shown to be moderately associated with intelligence. These associations have been explained either in terms of individual differences in some brain-wide property such as myelination, the speed of neural oscillations, or white-matter tract integrity, or in terms of individual differences in specific processes such as the signal-to-noise ratio in evidence accumulation, executive control, or the cholinergic system. Here we show in a sample of 122 participants, who completed a battery of RT tasks at 2 laboratory sessions while an EEG was recorded, that more intelligent individuals have a higher speed of higher-order information processing that explains about 80% of the variance in general intelligence. Our results do not support the notion that individuals with higher levels of general intelligence show advantages in some brain-wide property. Instead, they suggest that more intelligent individuals benefit from a more efficient transmission of information from frontal attention and working memory processes to temporal-parietal processes of memory storage.

Keywords: ERP latencies, event-related potentials, intelligence, processing speed, reaction times



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Thursday, November 09, 2017

Childhood Music Training Induces Change in Micro and Macroscopic Brain Structure: Results from a Longitudinal Study | Cerebral Cortex



Childhood Music Training Induces Change in Micro and Macroscopic Brain Structure: Results from a Longitudinal Study | Cerebral Cortex

From Neuro, a Flipboard magazine by Jack

Several studies comparing adult musicians and nonmusicians have…

Read it on Flipboard

Read it on academic.oup.com




Monday, November 06, 2017

12 Finalists named to take part in the Brainnovations Pitch Contest (December 6th, 2017)



12 Finalists named to take part in the Brainnovations Pitch Contest (December 6th, 2017)

Proud and excited to announce the 12 groundbreaking startups that will get to pitch their idea and solutions at…

Read it on Flipboard

Read it on sharpbrains.com




Sunday, November 05, 2017

Wig (2017, in press)-Segregated Systems of Human Brain Networks


Click on images to enlarge.

Article link.

This is an excellent and thought provoking brain network review that addresses the push-pull between optimal (and necessary) brain network segregation and more transient and fluid integration “on demand” to meet new task demands. Excellent summary.








ABSTRACT

The organization of the brain network enables its function. Evaluation of this organization has revealed that large-scale brain networks consist of multiple segregated subnetworks of interacting brain areas. Descriptions of resting-state network architecture have provided clues for understanding the functional significance of these segregated subnetworks, many of which correspond to distinct brain systems. The present report synthesizes accumulating evidence to reveal how maintaining segregated brain systems renders the human brain network functionally specialized, adaptable to task demands, and largely resilient following focal brain damage. The organizational properties
that support system segregation are harmonious with the properties that promote integration across the network, but confer unique and important features to the brain network that are central to its function and behavior.

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Friday, November 03, 2017

The landscape of brain health innovation: 130 experts and pioneers in 18 countries (and counting)



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The landscape of brain health innovation: 130 experts and pioneers in 18 countries (and counting)
// SharpBrains

— Registrants for the 2017 SharpBrains Virtual Summit (December 5-7th) as of November 3rd, 2017

Just a quick update on how registration stands for the upcoming 2017 SharpBrains Virtual Summit: Brain Health & Enhancement in the Digital Age (December 5-7th).

We are proud to report that so far 130 experts, pioneers and practitioners are registered to participate.

95 seem to be based in the US and 35 abroad, based on IP address during registration, with the following country breakdown:

  • United States 95
  • Australia 7
  • Canada 6
  • United Kingdom 4
  • Israel 3
  • Norway 2
  • Italy 2
  • Taiwan 1
  • Singapore 1
  • India 1
  • France 1
  • Sweden 1
  • Spain 1
  • Portugal 1
  • Brazil 1
  • Argentina 1
  • South Africa 1
  • Brunei 1

__________

Please consider joining us to explore the latest brain science and tech and market trends and to help shape Brain Health & Enhancement in the Digital Age.

For context, organizations represented in past Summits include: AARP, Alegent Health Immanuel Medical Center, Allstate Insurance, Alzheimer's Association, BBC, Bon Secours New York Health System, Brain Injury Association of America, Campbell Soup Company, Greenville Hospital System, Harvard Business Review, HealthComm Inc., Human Dimension Taskforce, US Army, Institute For The Future, Intel, Johnson & Johnson, Los Angeles County Dept of Public Health, McGovern Institute of Neurotechnology, MIT, National Resource Ctr. Osher Lifelong Learning Institutes, Nutrition Science Solutions, One Laptop Per Child, OptumHealth Behavioral Solutions, Piedmont Gardens, PsychologyToday, Procter & Gamble, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Stanford University, Sun Microsystems, UC Berkeley, UnitedHealth Group, Winter Park Health Foundation, Workers' Compensation Regulatory Authority, UCSF.

And the backgrounds of previous participants include: Biomedical Engineers, CEOs, Digital Media professionals, Entrepreneurs, Game publishers, Healthcare technologists, Marketing Executives, Medical Students, Neurologists, Neuropsychologists, Non profit board members, Occupational Therapists, Pharmaceutical Executives, Post doctorate researchers, Professors and Researchers, Psychiatrists, Psychologists, Psychotherapists, Scientific Publishers, Social Workers, Speech Pathologists, Talent management/HR, and Wellness professionals.

Looking forward to a great conference!

__________

Learn more & Reserve your Spot HERE

(10%-off promo code for SharpBrains readers: sharp2017)


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Read in my feedly



Thursday, November 02, 2017

How to detect the risk of dyslexia before learning to read - Scienmag: Latest Science and Health News



How to detect the risk of dyslexia before learning to read - Scienmag: Latest Science and Health News

Almost 10% of the world population suffers dyslexia. Establishing an early diagnosis would allow…

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Read it on scienmag.com




Thursday, October 26, 2017

DARPA's new brain device increases learning speed by 40%



DARPA's new brain device increases learning speed by 40%

Cheap and Non-Invasive New research funded by the U.S. Department of Defense's Defense Advanced Research Project Agency (DARPA) has…

Read it on Flipboard

Read it on futurism.com



******************************************************
Kevin McGrew, PhD
Educational Psychologist
Director, Institute for Applied Psychometrics
IAP
******************************************************

Musicians have better memory than nonmusicians: A meta-analysis

More research, this time a meta-analysis, documenting the cognitive benefits of musical training. I better not show this to my mother who never liked the fact that I only took one year of piano:)

Musicians have better memory than nonmusicians: A meta-analysis

Francesca Talamini, Gianmarco Altoè, Barbara Carretti, Massimo Grassi

Abstract

The three meta-analyses revealed a small effect size for long-term memory, and a medium effect size for short-term and working memory, suggesting that musicians perform better than nonmusicians in memory tasks. Moreover, the effect of the moderator suggested that, the type of stimuli influences this advantage.

Click on image to enlarge.




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Wednesday, October 25, 2017

More support for P-FIT model of intelligence

Abstract

The authors describe the brain regions involved in the process of intelligence using as a basis, the models of the theory of frontoparietal integration (P-FIT Model). They also correlate the model described with functional areas of Brodmann, integrating them into the tertiary brain areas and address the subcortical structures involved in cognitive processes, including the memory. The studies performed by functional magnetic resonance, also unmask various regions related with intelligence, neither previously described by Brodmann nor even in conventional models of learning. The anterior insular cortex presents itself as the most recent tertiary area to be considered. Subcortical structures, when injured, mimick injuries to the cerebral cortex, demonstrating their great participation in cognition. The topographies of aphasia and the functioning mechanisms of the bearers of learning disorders, including dyslexic, dysgraphia and dyscalculic should be reconsidered. A better understanding of this topographic anatomy may clarify the mechanisms used in those individuals with cerebral lesions.

Click on images to enlarge







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